Updates and observations from the world's leading communication experts, the Marconi Fellows

Recent blog posts
12
May
0

From Bell Labs to the Future

Posted by on

Marconi Fellow Herwig Kogelnik remembers the days when New Jersey was the center of communications engineering. 

   "We always have lots of visitors at Bell Labs. including Europeans and anybody else. [In early days of lasers] I think in the beginning it was pretty much a one way street, because nobody else was really doing very much yet. And now, it is not that way. Now we learn a lot from other people. But in the beginning, you know, with Bell Labs making such a big push I wouldn’t be surprised if for the first two years fifty percent of the laser work was in Bell Labs, something like that. In the early days Bell Labs represented a large part of the effort in quantum electronics." From an oral history by Joan Bromberg for the American Institute of Physics.

   Bell Labs was  - and remains - the home of many Marconi Fellows and Young Scholars. As more and more excellent work is produced around the world, Marconi is reaching out in many ways. 

   The IEEE has collected oral histories from many Marconi Fellows, including Paul Baran, Vint Cerf, Irwin JacobsBob Lucky and Andy Viterbi.  The IEEE history project is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in how communications technology developed.

 

Continue reading
0
04
May
0

John Stankey of AT&T: We need Fifth Generation gigabits for our customers

Posted by on

 "We all want to price so people can use as much as they want," Group President and Chief Strategy Officer Stankey said in the keynote of the Brooklyn 5G Summit. As people want more and more bandwidth, that will require wireless systems with far more capacity. Conference chair and NYU Professor Ted Rappaport, a Marconi Board member, believes millimeter wave wireless will be delivering gigabits in five to ten years. Stanford Professor Andrea Goldsmith outlined the possibilities of building up from advanced WiFi. Ali Sadri, chair of the WiGig Alliance, believes multi-gigabit shortrange 802.11ad chips are ready to come to market.

    CTOs and senior executives from Samsung, Nokia, Ericsson and Huawei outlined fast-moving plans to deliver equipment. It was a powerful event with some of the best engineers looking for common ground and to create a roadmap. AT&T announced a formal research partnership with NYU Wireless. 

     Interest from world class telcos like AT&T is inspiring the vendors to put literally thousands of engineers to work developing generation gigabits.

------- 

Saturday May 10, Marconi Fellow Vint Cerf will lead the TCP/IP 40th Anniversary Multi-Generational Picnic in Palo Alto's Mitchell Park. He'll be joined by other pioneers of the early days including Yogen Dalal and Judith Estrin. Admission, a sandwich and a commemorative glass costs $25, with discounts for youths, seniors and pioneers. 

Continue reading
0
18
Apr
0

John Cioffi elected to Internet Hall of Fame + 10 gigabit 8x8 MIMO WiFi

Posted by on

2006 Marconi Fellow John Cioffi was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame April 8. The Internet Society writes, "Dr. Cioffi  is best known as “the father of DSL.” It was his research that made the digital subscriber line (DSL) practical, and it has led to more than 400 publications and more than 100 pending or issued patents, many of which are licensed. He designed the world’s first Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) and Very-high-speed Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL) modems, which today account for about 98% of the world’s more than 500 million DSL connections. He holds fundamental patents on ADSL, VDSL, and vectored VDSL as well as several concepts in joint wireless/wireline transmission quality." 

       In connection with the awards, Cioffi wrote "Gigabits to Billions of Users," practical as wireless and wired connections work together. It's below.

     Separately, Quantenna announced they were developing a 10 gigabit 8x8 WiFi chip, using MIMO, a technology invented by 2014 Marconi Fellow A.J. Paulraj. 8x8 MIMO is also part of the LTE Advanced standard and has been demonstrated by Ericsson and others. That too should soon come out of the labs into daily use. Paulraj's Stanford colleague, Andrea Goldsmith, is a founder of Quantenna and was a panelist at a recent Marconi webinar.

 

GIGABITS TO BILLIONS OF USERS

John Cioffi

posted by John Cioffi
CEO and Chairman
April 8th, 2014

My induction into the Internet Hall of Fame is truly an honor, as is the opportunity I have had to help the Internet evolve and expand its reach around the world. In human history, the growth of the Internet is less than the blink of an eye, yet already we’re realizing amazing potential and endless possibilities achievable through high-performance, cost-effective access to the knowledge and ideas that the Internet provides.

As innovations continue to connect the world and deliver richer, faster, more diverse content, new, lower cost technologies soon will enable a billion people to connect to the Internet at gigabit/s speeds. A further five billion people will connect at tens and hundreds of megabits/s.

As a DSL inventor, I’m proud to reflect that today, DSL and wireless already can achieve these speeds, avoiding the often prohibitive costs and construction delays of running fiber to every home.

Belgium and Ireland currently lead the way to 100 megabits connections over copper, with Germany and Australia soon to follow.  Vectored VDSL is spreading like a tsunami, and the new standard G.fast raises these DSL connection speeds to hundreds of megabits on a single phone line.  

In the meantime, commercial wireless networks have reached 300 megabits/sec.  LTE advanced speeds of more than a gigabit/s soon will emerge from laboratories. Many respected engineers are confident that 5G wireless speeds can reach 10 gigabits/s per transmitter.

Wi-Fi and similar short range wireless systems can connect a dozen or more homes to share bandwidth for peak speeds. If each has 100 megabits on their phone line, any of the families would be able to connect at a gigabit/s when they need higher speeds. 

The first wave of the Internet has changed the world. As speeds further increase a hundred-fold, the world will be changed yet again.

 

 
Continue reading
0
09
Apr
0

5G Summit at NYU Wireless and Mobile Money event at Columbia CITI

Posted by on

CTO level executives from AT&T, Nokia, Samsung, Huawei join Stanford Professor Andrea Goldsmith and other researchers into the future of wireless at the Brooklyn 5G Summit April 23-25. It's hosted by NYU Wireless, led by Marconi Board member Ted Rappaport. "It's an extraordinary event at an extraordinary location." Marconi editor Dave Burstein believes. "Professor Goldsmith predicts that 5G will raise wireless speeds 50x over today's rates. These are the senior people who will be defining that future. Professor Rappaport in two years has built a world-class research center at NYU Wireless."

    April 28, CITI at Columbia University will host Mobile Money and Virtual Currency as Payment Systems for Clouds. CITI, led by Eli Noam and Bob Atkinson, is a longtime firend of the Marconi Society, which previously was administered at Columbia. Noam has been called the "leading public intellectual in communications" and CITI events are always strong.

Continue reading
0
09
Apr
0

Marconi Fellow Bob Kahn on what people first thought about the net

Posted by on

“Nobody really thought [the Internet] was a good idea back then, in terms of [business] opportunities,” Marconi Fellow Bob Kahn told a packed auditorium at Princeton’s Friend Center March 12 — the 25th anniversary of the invention of the World Wide Web.  Kahn, a Princeton alumnus, and Vinton Cerf, who are credited as the “fathers of the Internet,” pointed to how their one invention made thousands of other technological advances possible, just as earlier inventions such as the integrated circuit had led to the semiconductor industry. Since its creation, Kahn said, “It has scaled by a factor of a million.” HH

To read more about their talk, go to https://paw.princeton.edu/issues/2014/04/02/pages/4606/

Continue reading
0
31
Mar
0

Giovanni Corazza on Thinking Out of the Box

Posted by on

Marconi Society Board Member and University of Bologna Professor Giovanni Corazza recently asked a TEDxROMA audience, “"How do we assess the value of a new idea? If it's really new, nobody has ever seen it before. It is as if we had landed on a new planet, totally unexplored territory.” As Vint Cerf, Marconi Vice-Chairman and himself a recent TEDxROMA speaker, said in an email to Corazza, the talk was "truly inspiring." Corazza spoke on Creative Thinking - How to Get Out of the Box and Generate Ideas.  He advised,  "Look for alternatives and not the correct answer. When you think creatively, there is no correct and many possible alternatives." He goes on to point out the difficulty of understanding the value of something new. He said people often ask themselves, “Who am I to be the generator of that new idea? Probably, this has been thought about before. If this is correct, somebody else would have done it before me. These are natural mechanisms with which we kill our own ideas. We have to resist that. ... Serendipity happens all the time. We just need to have the eyes to see that." 

   Corazza warns, "If the environment punishes mistakes, you will never be tempted to go out of the box."

   Vint Cerf's TEDxROMA talk was about Bit Rot and the problems of reading today's digital data in the future. Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin in Bands of Brothers was able to reconstruct many discussions in Lincoln's Civil War cabinet. She scoured archives to find hundreds of letters of the time. Vint asks how historians 150 years from today read our letters and tweets or watch our videos? They probably won't be an easy way to interpret 8' floppies or VHS tapes. With a delightful sense of humor, Vint suggests developing "Digital Vellum." Rather than a physical medium, Vint proposes developing a logical way to encode both the data (the bits) and the software required to understand it. This isn't a simple problem and he's still looking for some of the answers.

Continue reading
0
01
Mar
0

Samueli: You Couldn't Start a Company Like Broadcom Today; Ash: Time to Start Burying Carbon Dioxide

Posted by on

2012 Marconi Fellow Henry Samueli was a UCLA professor when he and Henry Nicholas started Broadcom in 1991. Times have changed. "I don’t think you could start a company like Broadcom today. I think the industry has matured to a point that is very difficult for startups to make it in semiconductors, because the chips are so complex. They are a thousand times more complex than when we started the company. So you can’t design these chips with a handful of people anymore, like you used to be able to do. So, to start a company today, you’d probably pick a different field than semiconductors." From a strong interview with Samueli at Readwrite.

    Broadcom is actively working on wireless charging systems. Wireless charging hasn't drawn many customers. He tells Jessica Lipsky "Wireless charging standards have to converge, and I think this year they will figure out this market is not taking off until they get together, It's about much more than a smartphone market. The main driver is the Internet of Things." Lisky reports an estimate that 20 million wireless charging receivers were shipped,in 2013 but the market may expand to 700 million in four years.

1984 Marconi Fellow Sir Eric Ash is convinced that burying CO2 is practical and essential. >With the growing world shortage of energy, the chance of coal not being burnt is zero. But if we are to burn all the coal that is underground, we are in serious trouble." His Wolfson Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town urged "ordinary citizens to take charge and influence governments and companies to mitigate climate change, noting that it was highly unlikely that governments would do this on their own. But a groundswell from ordinary people could make a difference. Remember how difficult it was to persuade people that smoking was bad for their health?" Ash pointed out. "But ordinary people put pressure on governments and made a huge difference. I hope enough people take this on because the climate is worth saving.” 

Continue reading
0
01
Mar
0

March 6 Webinar: Paulraj, Samueli & Goldsmith on the Remarkable Wireless Future

Posted by on

Remarkable Wireless Future: More Megabits Soon, Gigabits to Come", will be the second "Marconi Expertise" webinar. The webinar takes place March 6, 10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. New York, 6 p.m. London. No charge to register 

MIMO inventor A.J. Paulraj, Stanford Professor and entrepreneur Andrea Goldsmith & Broadcom co-founder Henry Samueli will explain technology that will bring extraordinary gains in wireless speeds. No one is better able to describe the future of mobile than Stanford Professor AJ Paulraj. He invented MIMO in 1993 (http://bit.ly/Jh0629), a technology included in the iPhone5 and most current routers and mobile phones. He’s been working on gigabit wireless for more than a decade and is a leader in research for 5G wireless.

Henry Samueli, whose work led to the explosive growth of the consumer broadband industry, predicts a rapid evolution of wireless based on MIMO technology. “Smartphones will evolve to desktop computer performance levels within only a few years and by 2015 mobile Internet usage will overtake desktops with smartphones use growing four times faster than overall phone growth,” Samueli says. Samueli, the 2012 Marconi Prize winner, is co-founder and CTO of Broadcom, a world leading wireless chipmaker.

Goldsmith is working on massive MIMO systems, cognitive radio and green wireless system design. “The evolution of MIMO from broadband (10 Mb/s) to Gb/s rates should only be a matter of time as hardware for multichannel radio-frequency chains and digital signal processors become more affordable,” she says. Goldsmith founded Accelera, a company that creates wireless network virtualization technology, and Quantenna Communications, Inc. a leading developer of 802.11ac and 802.11n semiconductor solutions targeted at devices such as wireless set-top boxes, residential gateways video bridges, and other devices that deliver highly reliable broadband multimedia video and data services over Wi-Fi anywhere in the home.

 

Continue reading
0
06
Feb
0

David Payne wins James Clerk Maxwell Award, John Cioffi goes consumer with Cloudcheck, Bob Metcalfe goes back to the valley with Austin startups.

Posted by on

Sir David Payne, 2008 Fellow, was awarded the 2014 James Clerk Maxwell Award "for ground-breaking contributions to optical fiber technologies and their application to optical communications."  His erbium-doped fiber amplifiers are crucial to today's networks. 

Bob Metcalfe, 2003 Fellow, brought nine University of Texas startups to pitch at a special event in Menlo Park February 6. UTinSV (University of Texas in Silicon Valley.) They included a maker of wireless 3D cameras and another which claims to boost smartphone speeds. Ethernet inventor Metcalfe is now “Professor of Innovation” at the University of Texas engineering school. ”My general mission,” he told the Merc, “is to help Austin become a better Silicon Valley.”

John Cioffi, 2006 Fellow, has launched Cloudcheck, an app that allows consumers to ascertain the quality of their connection. Future releases will directly improve it. John's company ASSIA, created software that manages for carriers 70,000,000 DSL lines. With Cloudcheck they are are expanding into consumer products. 

Continue reading
0
23
Dec
0

"We've never had a scarcity of spectrum in the past." Cell phone inventor Marty Cooper

Posted by on

January 15 we're presenting 2013 Marconi Fellow, Marty Cooper, on Solving Spectrum ShortagesThe Webinar takes place 10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. New York, 6 p.m. London. Cell phone handset inventor Marty Cooper thinks regulators who want to control and carefully allocate “scarce” wireless spectrum have got it all  wrong. “We’ve never had a scarcity of spectrum in the past,” notes Cooper, questioning common belief in policy circles. “Technology has always kept up with the increasing needs and most often stayed ahead of these needs.” He believes we haven’t “exhausted the ability of technology to continue multiplying the available throughput of spectrum,” and continues to be optimistic that increased capacity will outpace increased demand.

The webinar includes wireless researcher Professor Ted Rappaport, policy expert Michael Calabrese and Marconi Young Scholar Felix Gutierrez, on January 15, 10 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. New York, 6 p.m. London.  (This is the first of  a series of “Marconi Expertise” webinars on telecommunications and Internet technology and policy issues, sponsored by the Marconi Society.) 

 

Moderator Dave Burstein, Editor of Fast Net News, promises a lively and highly interactive event. "Bring your questions and comments. This is a great opportunity to get answers from true experts."

To attend Do log in 15 minutes before to check your system

To pre-register (not required)

Full details including participant bios. 

 

 

Continue reading
0